How could we have allowed this architecture atrocity??

While San Francisco is experiencing an extreme population boom and even more severe housing crisis, it is very easy for those who do not know or really care to just walk with the mindset of lets tear it down to be able to house more people with a new, bigger building….

Before thinking so recklessly, let us use this example below to keep this all in our perspectives.  The tearing down of the Fox Theater and replacing it with Fox Plaza is one of the most outrageous oops’s SF has done to itself and even today, it stands as a landmark as to what not to do…. Continue reading

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Take a look at these numbers and then tell me SF bay real estate is not HOT HOT HOT!!

Houses going fast and high in San Francisco.

Just to give you some idea of what a hot market that is highly inflated (if you ask me!) for housing sales…  Check out these numbers….

Last year, 162 properties sold in the Bay Area for over $5 million.

AND In the 9 counties of the Bay Area, over 11,000 $1 million-plus properties were sold.

Now if you dont call that a sellers market… i dont know what is!

It does not surprise me though.  If you want anything more that 2 bedrooms in San Francisco, you are looking at over 1 million dollars.

That is pretty crazy and ridiculous to me if you ask.  I remember not very long ago, if you spent a half million dollars on a home, you were living LARGE.  …But… that is back when being a millionaire was a big deal.  Now i think you need to be a billionaire to really impress anyone these days.

So much for buying a house in my hometown in this lifetime!  And… they wonder why people want or have to rent…?  HELLO!!  Some of us dont make a 7 figure salary… and never will.  Thankfully, this is ok with me if this is our reality.  As long as i have a roof over my head, running water and insulation, i am all good. That is as long as i am in my home of SF. even if it is too expensive for god!  I am just going to enjoy it each day as it comes and hope that there are many before displacement is a reality for me too….

Dear San Francisco recent recruits… Question for you on housing…

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Dear San Francisco recent recruits... Question for you on housing...

If you make so much income, why are you really working for your landlord and not yourself? You know that you are being fleeced by your deep pocketed (and lined) landlord. It doesnt really have to cost that much to live in San Francisco but you are willing to give up up to 60% of your income in order to live here which means, you are really working for your landlord who is planning his retirement thanks to you now.

So, if you are making all of this elitist income, which entitles you to be able to call yourselves San Franciscans, WHY ARE YOU RENTING AT ALL???

You are supposed to be the smart ones right? If you were so smart, with interest rates where they are and programs for first time buyers in place, why on earth would you not be working to be paying yourself to be able to call yourself a SFer instead of some international corporation that is your landlord?

The thing that has been going through my mind ever since this new tech migration started moving in… How can these kids afford to be saving anything that they earn? They only eat out and at the hippest joints!. They can pay upwardly of up to 50-60% of their income on rent and the fees associated with hi-rise and condo living (parking, gym, etc.). They (mostly) refuse to use MUNI so only take cabs which by 2015 will not cost less than $5 just to get in.

Where are you saving or investing your income? How do you plan on actually becoming one of these rich people that you are pretending to be?

Real rich people are NOT renters that is for sure! And they have houses that are actually big enough to COOK in!

As well as a place to store all of your fun outdoor sporty equipment so you can stop having to rent a storage unit to house the real stuff in ones life. Hard to live so minimally without any storage or space isnt it? Hard to invest when you can not save. Hard to save when you are throwing all your money away as disposable income.

No wonder the city likes you so much! You come in, make a good wage and turn around and just gladly give it right back.

You all may be ‘smart’ but you do not have much common sense or intelligence. If you did, you would have migrated into this town with a whole different approach and with a knowledge of what their smartest way of integrating would be for both them and for those that they are trying to inter-merge with.

All of other groups in the past that get recruited or just decide to move to SF to work, if they can not find appropriate accommodations, They, in the past have taken a place outside the city until they can find the right place for them. Why is this not an option for you? If some of you had decided to do this, the cost of your rent would not be so overly inflated and you would be able to figure out exactly where in SF or otherwise you fit best thus looking in that area if you chose to come in after getting settled in your new job. This is how things have been done for the ages. What makes you think that instead of that, you can come in and force the market up into the sky so you can find a place right here right now??

I am just wondering, why is it not YOU that has to look outside the city to find a place and not people that have lived here for decades?

Remember the saying… First come first served… YOU are definitely NOT the first! So go serve yourself somewhere where there is availability. Quit being predators upon the local population AND with that awful entitled attitude problem of yours! It makes me truly SICK.

I am just saying….

This is just one random home that is currently for sale in San Francisco… Can you see the change?

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Screen Shot 2013-02-24 at 10.28.23 PM
Just incase we need a visual to get an idea of what San Francisco real estate market has been doing in the last couple years, here is a lovely chart thanks to Zillow. I know right now, i am just lucky to still be here! It wont be forever unfortunately. At least according to charts like this (and the rest are all the same…:(.

I have an idea for relief for this SF housing crisis….

Modern Apartment at 1000 N. Lasalle

Modern Apartment at 1000 N. Lasalle (Photo credit: PPMChicago-Alex)

Views over Plaza Cataluñya. Modern apartment f...

Views over Plaza Cataluñya. Modern apartment for sale in Barcelona|LFS3064 (Photo credit: lucasfoxbcn)

I dont know why some smart little city near sf (maybe like foster city over on the bay side or somewhere like that…) does not decide that they are going to invest in a portion of town and build luxury living (renting) and luxury dining for this part.  Clearly we need another place that these tech workers would consider living other than the city or there will be nothing but only tech and advertising highly paid kids living in the city.  They are young and quite wealthy (at least bringing in large paychecks) and want the lifestyle of luxury and modernity and hip swank. Continue reading

Dreams can actually come true in Detroit! Just look what a few dollars can buy you! You wont believe your eyes!!!

I want you to take a look at these pictures and then guess how much this mansion is asking on the market in Detroit….

649 Van Dyke Place, Detroit

649 Van Dyke Place, Detroit

(you can see all of the other pictures that were not able to be copied to this post over on Curbed.com’s detroit site.  Use this link… http://detroit.curbed.com/archives/2012/02/interoir-reveal-van-dyke-mansion.php).

…ARE YOU READY?  ok.. here goes.. take a seat or hold on to something tight…
This house.. no Mansion.. is selling for a whopping $One Hundred and Fourty-Five Thousand Dollars!!!

You can not even get a Studio in the Tenderloin here in SF for that much!!  It makes me light in the head just thinking about it!

……

Gosh Dang… I LOVE this place.  Living in San Francisco with the insane prices of, well, EVERYTHING, but especially home prices (even worse, rent prices…), i can not even comprehend a home like this selling for the price listed above.  Sheesh, (hopefully no one will do this), but just the architectural salvage would bring in more than they are asking.  I wish i could buy this beauty and live in it while i watch the city rebuild around me!  Detroit is now the perfect place for a huge artist community to come in and be able to finally create without worrying about how to come up with $2000 a month for a dinky studio apt.  With prices like that, how could an artist actually afford to make art unless they have already made it big?  I think there are big and awesome things in store for Detroit.

It is so sad to see what has happened to a major metropolitan mecca and almost unbelievable!  But i dont think that this city is going to be dead like this forever.  For many many americans (and others), this situation, that has happened to it has allowed dreams that were always only a fantasy, to come true.  There is actually a place now for those dreams to be lived out.  I have so much hope for Detroit, unlike SF.  The hope actually makes me happy and excited!  Sf is almost too far gone to try and grasp it back down to reality!  I wish it werent so far, or i’d take my measly $$ and actually try and become a home owner!
I have faith in you Detroit!  And… You will come back!

What needs to happen in San Francisco for the rental market to ease…. (or at least a place to start!)

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This rental market is too far spinning out of control!! This is becoming a huge blith on the lives of all that have to be here. Some drastic measures are going to need to happen soon by our city officials before the rental rises are going to keep charging up like a freight train. I personally right now, without an act of god, see it reversing any time soon let alone level off.

Bottom line, we need to get more rentals infused into our city

…. Where oh where are we going to find them? Lets see, we can build more cheap ugly high rises, we can force out our minority and low income residents,

OR… We can start cracking down on ALL of the illegal leased rentals being rented out at insane prices for a weekend as vacation housing on sites like AirBNB. Not only are all of these rentals that are being included in the numbers for the city being paid for in 2-4 nights for the month rent and sitting empty most of the time, they are not being charged any of the hospitality taxes that a regular-on the grid- bnb or hotel is. It is a massive loophole that is definitely an invisible factor to the lack of available rentals. The landlords should crack down about this stuff too. If a landlord finds a tenant sub leasing their apt. out, and it is not written into the lease, that is just cause for eviction i believe. I am sure the landlord would rather be making the money off of the people needing a place than a tenant!

And.. i think we need some city sponsored and funded low income housing built. Fast. But not cheaply! That is just my observation of a couple places we could make a few adjustments to try and help ease the strain a little.

The city made a LOT of hidden deals with a LOT of companies within the last year to have them bring their businesses here. They can not do that and bring in all that new revenue without providing necessary basics. Sometimes it takes money to make money and they need to take that cash out of their pockets and build some more housing for all of these people that they just enticed to come live here. It seems very corrupt down in city hall these days, because this is really the city’s problem and the city is the only single source that can fix it.

I think i have helped unlock to the key to my unease of the gentrification of San Francisco… Again!..

 

 


 

A conversation with one of my roommates led us to talking about the infamous after-hours nightclub / gay bar pioneer in SF, The Endup.  (It has quite the story ending with a fight for power after the third brother of the founder challenged the former club manager for the estate after his two first brothers passed away, one from AIDS and the next from a shooting accident.  I have not gotten that far in my research to tell you what happend there…. The Endup was turned over to brother 3 because of mismanagement of the moneys and some shady unpaid bills type history, which enraged the manager which kinda made him go kinda crazy to the point that he shot the brother in the back and then committed suicide after a 10 hour stand off with police two weeks later….anyway…) The Endup is a legend and thankfully to historical landmark distinction will be for years to come.  It is the one place they are gonna have a heck of a time getting rid of!  It is true SF fabric.

Of course in normal fashion, my roommate and i got into a good healthy discussion (argument) that i was not buying (one of my roommates has a vivid creative mind and memory!) and decided to try and fact check him (which is a regular activity for me and i hate to brag, but i am 98 out of 100 times right, or at least proving he is wrong actually usually.)

This in turn led me back down memory lane  which has become a bit foggy in areas which is always surprising (remember… WRITE IT DOWN NOW!! You will not remember it in 20 years most likely no matter how sure you could not forget!), and right into my old beloved home away from home…The Endup!

The Endup is a SF Landmark and now thankfully a little more protected for the future generations to use and experience and find themselves as the last almost 4 decades of generations have.  The Endup sits right under the Hwy 80 overpass and merging onto the Bay Bridge part of the freeway that runs right between Harrison and Bryant at 6th St.  Ironically it is also across the street (and on the opposite side of the 80 overpass from 850 Bryant, AKA the Hall of Justice (the popo station and jail.) ( Infact, now days, when you forget to move your car at 6am for commute flush down 6th, and your car get towed, you only have to go one block to not only retrieve your car, but pay your tickets that release your car.  In the old days, you had to go to 850 to pay and release and then (usually back) to 11th and mission to get your car from the infamous City Tow… unless you were REALLY having a bad day and they were full at City Tow and they took it to the city overflow lot at Pier 70 (way out down by Bayshore/ HP.).

When reading different articles about the crazy end of the era that i was there regularly (1992-1998ish) attending, i came across this AWESOME article that is truly the pre-curser to my writings regarding the fear and sadness in the changes i have seen in this city.  It brought it all back.  It is incredible that i forgot truly how horrible the dot com loft explosion fucked up our town.  It really took a huge blow.  One that was so immense that i did not know if it ever could truly recover.  I guess we will never know now because it hit before full recovery.  I was watching closely, but never imagined a just few years later it would happen all over again only instead of the all the industrial and lot spaces being made into these so called live/work-loft conversions all over town and especially SOMA and China Basin, but now, the only difference is that it is vertical.  They are putting up more high rises than i had ever realized until i watched a video on utube of the city from 1992.  It was so sparse then.  It is filling in and in and in and in!  And not picking the most beautiful of high rise structure always either unfortunately.  Hopefully the ugly ones will soon be covered  by yet another new layer of bldgs. OR, an earthquake takes em back down!

I am so upset by this, because i have lived this before!  How could I have forgotten so soon?  It is like tangible Deja Vous.  The kind that you can go back into for hours and bite onto.  I have watched the soul of this beautiful bohemia get sucked dry one time already and now i am horrifically watching it happen all over again.

To give you an idea of what it was like, you must read the article.  It was so close to home for me because i know a bunch of the people mentioned in the article (Kato, Charlotte the baroness, Martel & Pollywog).  These were my people.  This was my 20’s-30’s.  Now all over again for my 30’s-40’s only unfortunately now, without any real kind of kick ass underground or at least grounded parties:(.  Heart breaking i am telling you. H E A R T B R E K I N G !!!! ! ! !

Now re-live the boom that was the 90’s dot com invasion….

A huge THANK YOU and BRAVO to Michelle Goldberg circa 1998 in its full form….

 

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All We Want to Do Is Dance

[whitespace] IllustrationSan Francisco may not be facing the end of nightlife, but we are looking at the end of the mega-club, the end of the club-as-institutionBy Michelle Goldberg
Illustrations by Katherine Streeter

 

 

 

At 3pm on a Saturday, the EndUp is still going from the night before. On the dance floor, a girl–totally bald except for a tiny gelled spike of hair like a baby unicorn–gyrates in lime-green platform shoes and fluorescent orange hip-huggers. A stunning white-blonde from Austria sits on a banister and sways while her boyfriend, a compact man from Ethiopia with a long, black goatee and tiny rectangular glasses, moves with funky, serpentine grace on the dance floor. He’s been at it since midnight the night before, she tells me. The dancers spill out onto the Edenic back patio, where the sound of fountains mingles with the insistent thump of house music. Bright and lush with palm trees, the back yard of the EndUp is a kind of country club for the underground, where people who still look shockingly attractive after nearly 20 hours of partying stretch out in the San Francisco springtime sun. No wonder local scenester Miss Polly called her book I Found God at the EndUp.

But the EndUp, like nearly every other club South of Market, could be gone by 1999, forced out by a locust-like invasion of lofts and their attendant noise complaints. “It’s a basic struggle for life. It’s almost like the Native Americans that were overrun,” says Carl Hanken, the EndUp’s avuncular, white-haired owner, a former research chemist. “The EndUp could go. It’s a distinct possibility. It’s almost a week-to-week existence for the club industry. Each week I hear of some other problems.”

San Francisco may not be facing the end of nightlife, but we are looking at the end of the mega-club, the end of the club-as-institution. It’s one of many ironies in this unfortunate situation that San Francisco’s booming economy is threatening the very vitality that accommodated so much of our region’s famed technological development. The fate of SOMA could indicate something much larger–whether bohemia can coexist with our decade’s gonzo postindustrial hypercapitalism.

“Money has destroyed San Francisco’s bohemia and attitude,” says Hanken. “Young people were once more driven by idealism; these are more driven by the buck. They operate more with the head than with the heart. That’s why we have the confrontation.”

Hanken says that it would be impossible to open up a club like the EndUp today, and most club promoters agree that for the last few years the club scene has been moving to smaller bars and lounges. There’s currently a moratorium on after-hours permits in SOMA, and while some of San Francisco’s best parties are held in small bars–Kate O’Brians, Liquid, The Top–they can never approach the grandiose decadence of a 1015 or a Club Townsend.

Whether or not SOMA nightclubs are able to survive depends on whether the notoriously apolitical nightclub scene can pull together to fight a gentrification process that has become so ingrained in big cities that it’s seen as inevitable–first the “pioneers,” the nightclubs and artists, move into an industrial wasteland, making it both habitable and hip and popularizing its new name. The yuppies follow, rents skyrocket, and the nomadic creative types start the whole process again somewhere else. Many see it as a foregone conclusion that what happened in New York’s SoHo–where an artists’ neighborhood became a shiny maze of chichi boutiques–will also happen to San Francisco’s SOMA.

“What happened in SoHo is clearly happening here,” says San Francisco senior planner Paul Lord. “In New York, Alphabet City wasn’t far behind. Here, Alphabet City could be the back side of Potrero Hill or the South Bayshore, but where’s Manhattan’s Alphabet City now? That’s gone yuppie, too.” New York’s quality-of-life-obsessed Mayor Rudy Giuliani has been padlocking nightclubs and yanking licenses for years now, and San Francisco is following in his ignoble footsteps.

Of course the greatest irony in all this is that SOMA is becoming a victim of its own coolness. The professionals who are moving into SOMA lofts go there seeking hipness–the new live/work spaces are essentially condos built to look like converted warehouses, their faux-industrial chic as transparent as that of an Urban Outfitters or a Starbucks. And just as the notorious coffee monolith has strangled so many of the boho java joints that inspired it, so SOMA’s culture is being trampled by developers selling “authentic” hipster lifestyles for half a million bucks.

As a result of land-use laws passed in the ’80s in order to make SOMA more hospitable to artists, the area is zoned for both living and light industry. That means that nightclubs are being forced to comply with the same noise-abatement limits as residential neighborhoods. SOMA lofts were supposed to go to artists, people who really did live and work in their spaces. But here we have the situation’s second great irony–there are no guidelines in place to decide what constitutes an artist because the artists themselves resisted efforts to legally define them. They didn’t foresee that SOMA would become a hot address for technology professionals who can afford to plunk down the $250,000 to $500,000 asking price for the area’s new lofts or “live/work units.”

Loft development has risen exponentially–there are 1,000 units pending right now, according to land-use attorney Sue Hestor. And as new residents with early bedtimes move in, they’re calling the police and demanding enforcement of noise laws. As a result, the VSF is close to having its permits revoked, the Holy Cow has had its permits temporarily suspended, and other clubs are feeling an increased police presence. “We haven’t had a noise complaint in 10 years, until last weekend, when noise abatement was knocking on people’s doors and asking them if they had a problem with us,” says Robin Reichert, owner of the Paradise Lounge. “In large cities, noise ordinances are a way to select or select out what kind of businesses are going to be in an area. In the next three or four months, we could lose all the clubs.” The officer in charge of noise abatement, Edward Anzore, responded that Reichert is “a pain in the butt” and said that knocking on neighbors’ doors is standard during noise-abatement investigations, which are conducted “the same way we would do a criminal investigation. We knock on neighbors’ doors and say, ‘Do you hear the music?’ If the noise can be heard inside a person’s apartment, it’s a violation of the noise ordinance.”

SOMA loft-owners don’t see themselves as interlopers but as a fledgling community. “Longtime SOMA residents are bitching and moaning about yuppies like me moving in,” says one new-media professional who recently bought a $350,000 loft at Seventh and Brannan. “There’s a core group of people who won’t be satisfied until SOMA returns to what it was five years ago, an industrial no man’s land, but the bottom line is that people like me outnumber people like them 10 to 1.”

He continues, “The fact that they close SOMA’s nightclub district doesn’t mean that San Francisco is going to lose all its nightclubs. They’re just going to have to find a new place. If you go to China Basin, it’s like SOMA used to be. Very few people live there, and more and more nightclubs will be moving into that neighborhood.”

But the yuppification treadmill has speeded up tremendously in the past few years, and San Francisco is only about 50 square miles. Perhaps the clubs could move to China Basin, but the lofts will surely follow, and after that, there’s just ocean. “We are right now in the middle of a white-hot economy where the pace of change is very fast,” says Richard LeGates, director of the urban studies program at S.F. State. “Processes which may have taken 20 years in Greenwich Village are happening in the space of a few years in San Francisco.”

IllustrationBesides, club owners who have owned their buildings for decades can’t just pick up and move every few years–the EndUp has been on Sixth Street for 26 years. The argument that neighborhoods necessarily go from clubland to yuppieville is just “onanism of the mind,” says Hanken. “They like to massage themselves in comfortable places. It’s a sugar-coated excuse. These people are nine-to-fivers. They’re not involved in the club scene, and they see us as transient. That is their problem. They simply do not understand us. We cannot move. We have many encumbrances. There are handfuls of licenses to maintain. All they need is another buck, or five hundred thousand, and they’ll move. We’re stuck.”

Lord says that even if the clubs did move, they can’t be assured that the new neighborhoods will remain conflict-free. “Until we get some controls in place, the club owners don’t have a high degree of certainty about where they can locate and not be in proximity to a residential development,” says Lord. “Right now all of the industrial areas are fair game for live/work development.”

The building that houses the Holy Cow has been a fixture in San Francisco’s nightclub scene since 1966, when it opened as The Stud. Last year it was bought by Jeff Thompson, Matt Goodrich and Bill Herrmann, three 31-year-old guys who met as barbacks in the club in 1990 and traveled the world together in 1992. The three work in the club up to 20 hours a day, and under their ownership the Holy Cow had been an overwhelming success. Then, a month ago, they lost many of their permits–they can no longer allow dancing, DJs, pool or pinball. While they wait for provisional permits, their business is down 70 percent. It’s like some kind of twisted version ofFootloose–they’re forced to patrol their club and make sure patrons don’t start dancing.

“Moving for us means bankruptcy,” says Thompson. Adds Herrmann, “For the people who have told us to move to China Basin and Hunters Point, my answer to these people is that if you like that area so much, you move down there. That’s a long way for people to go just to go dancing, especially for tourists. There’s a need for residences, but you can’t blanket the whole city and turn San Francisco into a suburb.”

Then there’s a third irony. Tourism is San Francisco’s No. 1 industry, and the nightclubs are a huge part of our city’s draw. Mayor Brown is often criticized for being wildly pro-business, yet he’s sitting back as developers blithely destroy one of San Francisco’s most vital industries–entertainment. What’s even stranger is that Brown is known as the party mayor–he’s been spotted at the EndUp and at the New Year’s Eve Treasure Island rave, and his son, Michael Brown, is one of the city’s biggest club promoters.

“Maybe Willie Brown’s son should be sensitizing him to this problem,” says Lord. “If you have that natural sort of entry, maybe the nightclub owners really need to get to the mayor’s son and say, ‘Look, you’ve got to bring this to his attention or get us a meeting with him so we can bring it to his attention.’ “

Lord continues, “What seems strange to me is that this city will sit and watch while certain types of nighttime entertainment disappear for youth, while things like Crazy Horse and the Gold Club are going in their place. I don’t understand the city’s priorities when it comes to giving young people an alternative. Dancing is a healthy thing to do. A lot of people have seen that if young people do not have some place to go and let off all this incredible energy that they’ve got, it’s going to lead to trouble in one way or another. I don’t know what the state of the rave scene is anymore, but that was something where people said, We want to keep partying, and we’re going to do it after-hours, we’re going to get into buildings that maybe we shouldn’t even be in.”

The club owners will need an economic argument to counter the financial powers behind loft development, says Lord. “One of the major industries in San Francisco, one of the things that drives our office market, is insurance and real estate,” he says. “Mortgage brokers and financial institutions, they’re making the loans on these properties that are selling from anywhere from a quarter of a million to half a million dollars. There are literally billions of dollars involved in the live/work development process. If you look at the major downtown businesses that are involved as brokerage agencies, as mortgage companies, as title companies, as lawyers representing the condos, these are major, major players in the San Francisco political scene.

“The club owners themselves need to be organized to protect their rights,” Lord says. “They are a legitimate business concern in San Francisco that brings large numbers of tourists and visitors to the area. In fact, a case could be made that the proximity of the nightclubs to the Yerba Buena center has an influence on people deciding to have conventions in San Francisco of one sort or another. The club owners need to let their decision-makers, from the mayor to the Board of Supervisors to the Planning Commission, know what is at risk. If you look at the gross receipts, payroll taxes and other influences that the clubs have on attracting visitors and tourists to San Francisco, it’s an important aspect of the richness that is San Francisco and the diversity that is San Francisco. Visitors and tourism are the No. 1 industry in S.F. [Clubs] need to be able to demonstrate that they are a significant and important player in that sector of the economy and, in doing so, show the city what’s at risk if they aren’t here anymore.”

The organization that Lord spoke of has already started. On a recent Tuesday night, a hundred or so club owners, musicians, artists and old SOMA residents gathered at the Transmission Theater to form a coalition aimed at fighting development in SOMA and saving the area’s businesses. Hestor, who’s been in the thick of the loft controversy for years, explained the conflict’s history to the crowd of political novices. Said Brainwash owner Susan Schindler, “We need to know what we’re talking about besides knowing what pisses us off.” The crowd got increasingly passionate as Hestor elaborated on live/work abuses. One girl shouted, “They’re for people who want to live like pimps with their exposed brick walls!” Someone else added, “We created the fad, that’s the whole problem!” To which a third person replied, “We can’t help it if we’re cool!”

But despite Tuesday evening’s energy, some in the club scene feel that it’s not necessarily the city government’s job to safeguard hipness, and others are just giving up on San Francisco. Even Martel Toler, who with his partner Nabil Musleh is the owner of Sushi Groove and the club mogul behind parties like Release, Eye Spy and Leopard Lounge, says he was thinking about splitting. “San Francisco already is not a major party town or a town where there’s a ton of places to go out at night. I was even thinking about moving, especially in the last year, to Miami, New York or L.A.”

Some of the city’s biggest promoters and DJs believe the club scene thrives on adversity. “I don’t want it to happen, but I also believe in the natural evolution of things,” says Kato, the impresario behind Royal Jelly. “Until alternative art culture and club culture have no place to go, it’s a matter of not holding on to situations and realizing that maybe we do need to be uprooted sometimes. I actually have been getting tired of the same old spaces.”

DJ Charlotte the Baroness is reluctant to blame gentrification for destroying the nightclub scene. “You haven’t been able to open up a major nightclub in this city for years, but we have a Catch-22, because while the gentrification that’s going on in SOMA is definitely affecting the ability to have more nightclubs, at the same time gentrification has really helped the nightclub scene. Those people are the ones going to clubs and spending money on drinks. Those are the people who are paying our bills.”

She continues, “This challenges people. The rave scene has now moved back into the big club scene, and now if there’s going to be a problem there, it will motivate people to start doing underground parties again. It’s just another chapter in the dance-music scene. I would welcome people starting to get more innovative about parties again.”

DJ Pollywog says she’s so frustrated with the lack of venues to play at in San Francisco that she’s planning on moving to New York. “Clubland for the most part has been pretty weak,” she says. “It’s the same old clubs doing the same parties. I love San Francisco and I wish there were more opportunities out here. If there were a more thriving nightlife here, then there would be no reason for me to leave.”

Like Kato and the Baroness, Pollywog thinks that clubland could find new energy away from the SOMA corridor. “When you change to a different location, you change the vibe of your party. That’s why, in a lot of ways, San Francisco nightlife is tired. It’s ‘Oh, same club, same thing.’ It’s a little bit stale if it’s the same spaces over and over. Part of the underground is wanting to stay fresh, and it takes those creative, pioneering types to build up something. Established clubs make it easier because all you have to do is show up. Creative people in the underground are almost against that, because it’s important to have fresh energy.”

Still, Pollywog says that without the big clubs, San Francisco can’t attract big-name DJs. “If we lose these big clubs, we’re going to lose so much credit on the international scene. No small club has the capital to fly in Dimitri from Paris or Dimitri from New York. Some underground people are like ‘Oh, the big clubs suck,’ but I know that they definitely have a place and are vital in keeping the scene alive. It’s important to have yin and yang.”

Back at the EndUp, DJ Jason Hayes says that the lack of replacements for the big clubs is affecting his career, and his friend Peter Letourneav fears that San Francisco is being turned into a kind of faux-chic Disney World. Inside, though, manager Alison Page is smiling as she surveys the crowd, convinced that bulldozing developers are no match for the ecstatic energy that keeps people dancing through the dawn and into the next evening. “After the comet hits,” she says, “after the earthquakes and tidal waves, the EndUp will be left standing.”

San Francisco | MetroActive Central | Archives]

 

 


From the May 18-31, 1998 issue of the Metropolitan.

Copyright © Metro Publishing Inc. Maintained by Boulevards New Media.

 


Foreclosures – Real Estate Investing San Jose.com Real Estate

 

 

berg who wrote the following piece written in i believe the mid late 1990’s.

Why this generation’s yuppies suck so much more than the generation that was around first in the 1980’s….

  I was down on my main shopping street this morning shopping at a little childrens consignment store that also have womens clothes in the back.  There were 2 couples inside shopping with each of their one child.  They were SO LAME!  The husband was like a nerd finally getting to go to the science fair he was following his wife and child around like a dog looking for a snack saying things like… “oh honey, do we need to get her some rain boots?  I know she has snow boots, but not rain boots.”  …I live in San Francisco, what on earth would you do buying snow boots for a one year old?   They were also totally unaware of anyone else shopping in the store.  I was in the corner looking at a rack and stepped backwards 1 step and stepped on the guy.  PERSONAL SPACE?  MEAN ANYTHING TO YOU?  Not to mention, he was just blocking me in back in the womens clothing section.  Go wait outside for godsake!  This place is tiny and you are following your wife and child around like you are leashed to them.  I heard probably close to 20 “honey”‘s.  It was really pissing me off!  So much to the point that i turned around and gave them a look of pure disgust. 

By now you might be saying to yourself…  Boy, this girl has a really bad attitude problem or …It doesn’t sound to me like they are doing anything wrong other than shopping.  Both are probably true, but there is more to this than that.

 

I am becoming so angry with the selling out of San Francisco that it is becoming true hatred of these stupid people that have bought out our town.  They think that they are so fricking cool living the awesome young startup life.  The thing that they are totally ignorant about is the fact that a family or long term resident was probably made homeless thanks to them.  They march into this city and say “Ooh!  It is so cute and pretty!”  “it has such a cool style and the people here are all so… well… affluent and mostly white with some asians in there too.  Phew!

What makes this round of yuppies different than the original yuppies of the 80’s?  A LOT!  You see, the yuppies in the 80’s were a direct rebellion of the hippies of the 70’s.   They took everything that was associated with hippies and did the opposite.  What was really earthy became really glitzy.  While it was cool to recycle in the 70’s (clothing especially!) in the 80’s it was new or nothing!  And in the 70’s, thanks to the vietnam war, you never could have gotten away with flaunting one’s wealth like became popular with the 80’s yuppie generation.  

This round’s yuppies are not about flaunting their wealth, but instead, quietly judging and feeling oh so important.  This generation of yuppies are the ones that have been listening to the media’s fear campaigns for the last 20 years and actually bought that load of crap.  Now they walk around in life absolutely terrified of ANYTHING that they think will splatter bright red paint on their precious white picket fence.  

So, now, YUPPIE = NIMBY.  They are the “not in my back yard” types that are thinking that as long as they keep their bubble of protection safely secured around them, then all is well.  They do not even think to look and see if they are stealing someone elses dream in order to fulfill their own.  They do not understand that it is diversity that has made this town so beautiful not the South of Market lofts.  They dont realize that the town that they think that they bought into, they are actually part of the process which is destroying it.  Not to mention all of the people’s community’s that have been here for generations.  They just think about what a deal they got on that 1million dollar 1 bedroom flat that they bought out of city held auction that was a victim of foreclosure.  Not that 3 generations of people lived in that foreclosed unit for 45 years before the twats bought it.  

Now the new yuppies dig in their heels and proclaim that this is their neighborhood and they refuse to allow anything to possibly bring their property value down or be a possible risk for lowering the quality of the neighborhood.  May that be a venue that plays live music or a pot club.  

These people do not think with the mentality that being an individual is what makes this world so beautiful.  They think that they all should be buying a Prius and that the only color to paint a house is one of 20 shades of sand.  They are ruled by fear and fear alone.  They havent seen strife, they havent ever had to give up their creature comforts and they think that they are VERY important people.

This leaves me with a little vomit in the base of my throat.  These people do not know shit!  They just came in and took over… Just like the Spaniards and the White man.  So, i suppose that this is nothing new.  But i bet we feel all a similar feeling of invisible loss.  And sometimes visible loss.  

This is for me, mostly the loss of a collective soul that has been what drew people to San Francisco.  My ancestors were the Levi’s family who helped build this town back in the 1800’s.  It is amazing that after living here for 18 years, if I have to move, i have to look outside the city because the rents are so fricking high.  The town that i have actively been a part of and has been a part of me AND my ancestors help build! has been sold out… and mostly not even to people from this state let alone this country.  It just makes me really depressed. 

So, if you see me around the city and i have a foul scowl on my face and you hear me saying bad words like gentrification and sell out and nimby, know why.  It goes deeper than me just being a bitch.  I am being a bitch with something to lose!

Link

You have got to see these multi-purpose furniture pieces! They are so clever and space saving!

I just love me a two-for!  These pieces that i found through Curbed.com at Freshome.com are really cool and worth a look!

 

wardrobe-sauna-Freshome02.jpg

 

Link

Macondray Lane

Macondray Lane (Photo credit: rockcreek)

Macondray Lane

Macondray Lane (Photo credit: jrover)

Macondray Lane
Macondray Lane (Photo credit: sabel)

(link) This is like the little perfect dream home on the ‘tales of the city’ street

Gosh how perfect this little home snuggled into Macondray lane in San Francisco.  You know… the one that Mrs.Madrigal lived on!

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